Posts Tagged ‘Rona Barrett Foundation’

Rona Barrett Foundation Announces Start of $3.5 Million Campaign for Golden Inn & Village

July 29, 2014  |  News  | 

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http://www.noozhawk.com/article/rona_barrett_foundation_announces_start_of_3.5_million_campaign_for_golden

golden_vill&inn Top row from left, Mike Focht and Alice Gilaroo, Campaign for Golden Inn & Village Committee chairwoman; next row from left, Linda Burrows and Fred Rice; next row from left, Bob Jurgensen and Tony Morris; next row from left, Susan Weber and Annalisa Nearn; and bottom row from left, Tresha Sell and Rona Barrett. Not pictured: Linda Kastner, Sid Kastner and Steve Reden. (Rona Barrett Foundation photo)

 

 

By Kelly Kapaun for the Rona Barrett Foundation | Published on 07.29.2014 3:46 p.m.

Representatives from the Rona Barrett Foundation have announced the start of an ambitious three-year, community-wide fundraising campaign to raise $3.5 million to complete the construction and furbishing of the Golden Inn & Village and provide seed money for essential programs and services to be delivered there for resident seniors and all seniors from the community.

The GIV will be the first senior housing project in the County of Santa Barbara and the State of California to provide affordable, aging-in place senior care for the Santa Ynez Valley’s most vulnerable seniors.

It will be located at the heart of the community at the intersection of Refugio Road and Highway 246 across from the YMCA, Santa Ynez Valley High School, the Christian Academy and El Rancho Market.

For more information, click here or call 805.688.8887.

— Kelly Kapaun is a publicist representing the Rona Barrett Foundation.

 

Rona Barrett’s Gray Matters

July 24, 2014  |  News  |  ,

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http://syvnews.com/lifestyles/rona-barrett-s-gray-matters/article_b94912d4-98be-5084-886e-6866b76d4761.html

Be prepared to be unprepared

How do you prepare for the deep, dark abyss of losing a part of yourself?

When my husband, Bill, died way too young I was stunned. I couldn’t believe it. I walked around in a daze. I was so completely unprepared in every way.

I’m not ashamed to say I cried and cried and cried. I was always crying. I didn’t want people to feel sad or sorry for me so I didn’t go out in public, even with close friends until a group of them called and said, “We’re kidnapping you!”

The cliché is “time heals all wounds” but it doesn’t. I’d watch a movie and something someone in the movie said would remind me of him. Eating a particular food he liked would trigger a memory. After 30 years of marriage it’s just not easy to forget – or to heal. I still cry 13 years after his death.

At one point I thought my life without Bill was more than I could emotionally bear. I wanted to end it all. Then one day I said to myself, “Stop this girl. Enough is enough! You’ve survived more than most and more than once. You’ve got to get busy.”

Of course I did. My father needed me more than ever. So did many other friends, much older than I, who had also lost loved ones.

I resisted offering my friends clichés in a well-meaning effort to comfort such as, “I know what you’re going through.” No one knows what anyone is going through. Each marriage, each relationship, and each death is a unique experience. The vow “’till death do us part” resonates beyond expectation when it actually happens.

The late Dr. Joyce Brothers wrote of her loss when her husband of more than 30 years passed away. This was a woman who built her long and highly successful career on advising people through their most difficult times. She thought she was prepared. But she was not prepared. Her book, “Widowhood,” chronicling her fall into her personal abyss and her climb out of it, is still available and still comforting those in need.

Once I made up my mind, it got easier to be with more and more people and I could carry on with my life. I am now married to my wonderful, delicious Daniel, the scribe, who is actually the first man I ever met when I came to Hollywood. And I am once again fulfilled with the work I am involved in.

If I were pressed to advise someone, I would tell her or him to be prepared to be unprepared. Allow your heart, mind, and body to dictate what you should be doing on your own timetable and in your own way.

I have gratitude in my heart every day. There are still days when the memories of the past abound – memories I can never forget and I won’t try.

I truly believe: Think lucky and the universe will give you what you need.

The years go on. Life goes on. I have survived. And so will you.

Until the next time…keep thinking the good thoughts.

Rona Barrett is President and CEO of the nonprofit Rona Barrett Foundation dedicated to finding solutions with affordable housing and care services for Seniors In Need. Reach her at [email protected]

 

Rona Barrett Foundation kicks off fundraising campaign

July 15, 2014  |  News  |  ,

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http://syvnews.com/news/local/rona-barrett-foundation-kicks-off-fundraising-campaign/article_957c647d-421f-50c7-89da-5287a7c8c388.html

The Rona Barrett Foundation is launching a three-year, $3.5 million fundraising campaign to complete the construction of the Golden Inn and Village, a senior housing project that will provide affordable care to Santa Ynez Valley’s most vulnerable seniors.

The facility is located at the corner of Refugio Road and Highway 246.

Phase 1 of the Golden Inn and Village includes the construction of 60 affordable independent living units for low-income seniors, an adult community center and 27 affordable units for facility employees and community workers who serve residents and qualify for housing assistance.

The cost of Phase 1, is $33.5 million, $30 million of which will be financed through income streams generated by the Housing Authority of Santa Barbara County.

“With the critical need for affordable housing for economically disadvantaged seniors rapidly growing in our region, we are committed to raising the $3.5 million necessary to complete the GIV,” said Rona Barrett.

In June, the Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors unanimously approved zoning changes and lot splits on the facility’s site. The approval allows the HASCB to apply for federal and state tax credits to complete construction.

Phase 2 of the project, which will include the staffing of the 60-unit Assited Living and Memory Care Unit, is planned for a later date.

The Rona Barrett Foundation is a non-profit organization seeking to provide affordable housing and supportive services for seniors in need.

Copyright 2014 Santa Ynez Valley News. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

 

Rona Barrett Foundation Launches $3.5 Million Community Campaign for Golden Inn & Village

July 10, 2014  |  News  | 

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http://www.noozhawk.com/article/rona_barrett_foundation_launches_campaign_golden_inn

goldenvillageAn artist’s conception of the Rona Barrett Foundation’s Golden Inn & Village.

By Kelly Kapaun for the Rona Barrett Foundation | Published on 07.10.2014 5:46 p.m.

Representatives from the Rona Barrett Foundation have announced the start of an ambitious three-year, community-wide fundraising campaign to raise $3.5 million to complete the construction and furbishing of the Golden Inn & Village and provide seed money for essential programs and services to be delivered there for resident seniors and all seniors from the community.

The GIV will be the first senior housing project in Santa Barbara County and California to provide affordable, aging-in place senior care for the Santa Ynez Valley’s most vulnerable seniors.

It will be located at the heart of the community at the intersection of Refugio Road and Highway 246 across from the YMCA, Santa Ynez Valley High School, the Christian Academy and El Rancho Market.

Phase 1 of the GIV includes the building of 60 urgently needed affordable independent living units for low-income seniors, an adult community center and 27 affordable employee units for GIV employees and other indispensable community workers who serve local residents every day and  qualify for housing assistance.

GIV’s Phase 1 will cost $33.5 million; $30 million will be financed through income streams generated by the Housing Authority of Santa Barbara County, the foundation’s pace-setting project partner, and the additional $3.5 million to be raised from private contributions from the community by the Rona Barrett Foundation. The “Campaign for GIV” has raised $1.6 million to date with $1.9 million required to bring the campaign to its goal.

This pioneering private/public partnership between the Rona Barrett Foundation and the HACSB will generate an impressive return on the community’s charitable investment in the project ROI. For each dollar contributed to the “Campaign for the GIV,” $23 will come back to the Santa Ynez Valley in the form of local jobs, salaries and expenditures for equipment, transportation, supplies and services.

Furthermore, and most importantly, “With the critical need for affordable housing for economically disadvantaged seniors rapidly growing daily in our region, we are committed to raising the $3.5 million necessary to complete the GIV,” Rona Barrett said. “The foundation is fortunate to be able to call upon the dedicated efforts of key volunteer leaders who have a strong commitment to help meet the pressing needs of our most vulnerable seniors.”

The GIV cleared an important hurdle with the unanimous approval by the Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors for a zoning changes and lot splits on the GIV site. This approval allows the HACSB to apply for federal and state tax credits to complete construction. Phase 2 of the GIV — the construction and staffing of the 60 unit Assisted Living and Memory Care Unit — will be come about at a later date.

— Kelly Kapaun is a publicist representing the Rona Barrett Foundation.

 

Rona Barrett: Advance Care Directive Can Provide Peace, Comfort Toward the End

July 2, 2014  |  News  |  ,

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By Rona Barrett | Published on 07.02.2014 3:10 p.m.

http://www.noozhawk.com/article/rona_barrett_toward_the_end

 

Woody Allen wrote, “Forever is a long time, especially toward the end.”

“Toward the end” is what I write about today.

So many of my friends and co-workers in the entertainment business seem to wear a sheath of “live forever” invincibility. Perhaps it’s because so many of our careers are built on a high-grade, plutonium-like core of self-confidence — the sureness to gamble on oneself.

A friend of mine had this moxie. More than a friend, I called him my brother (and that’s how I will refer to him from now on). I had known him since I was a teenager. I became executor of his estate. He was in the entertainment industry and a multimillionaire.

But toward the end he lost everything — except his ability to carry out his last wishes.

He had been in and out of hospitals. In his final board and care, my brother fell out of bed and severely cracked his head.

Because he was in a coma state, the doctors had no other choice but to send him to a hospital for the severely injured who were dying.

One day he suddenly awakened and whispered, “Rona, let it happen. Just let it happen.”

I kissed him and said, “Everything is going to be OK.”

I immediately called his doctor and said, “He just told me he wants it over. No more treatment.”

This difficult decision was not made quickly, irrationally or based on the emotions of the moment.

In fact, the decision was made many years before, by my brother, based on his own philosophy and religious beliefs. He was of clear mind and took time to think through his final wishes, then detailed them in writing. In this case, my brother had specifically spelled out that he did not want to be sustained with any form of life support if it was clear that it would only prolong the inevitable.

The process of letting him go was gradual. Within four days, my brother for more than 50 years was gone.

I was able to respect his last wish to pass away with a degree of dignity for one simple reason: an advance medical directive.

He had a written document that told his doctors, family and friends how he wanted to be treated should he become physically or mentally unable to make informed decisions.

The California Hospital Association has a wonderful sample document available by clicking here.

In addition, Aging with Dignity’s “Five Wishes” is an easy-to-complete, step-by-step guide that walks you through the entire process of discussing, deciding on and documenting what goes into an advance care directive. More than 40 states, including California, recognize the results as a legal document.

Also, the Santa Barbara-based Alliance for Living and Dying Well has support resources you may find helpful, “especially toward the end.”

Completing a directive is as much for your loved ones as it is for yourself. By considering your options early, you avoid having your family making difficult decisions under duress.

It usually takes a bit of a scare before most people to do it. But please, don’t wait!

Until next time … keep thinking the good thoughts.

— In honor of her late father, entertainment journalist, author, senior activist and Santa Barbara County resident Rona Barrett is the driving force behind the Golden Inn & Village, the area’s first affordable senior living and care facility, scheduled to begin construction in early 2015. Contact her at [email protected]. The opinions expressed are her own.

 

Central Coast Wine Classic celebrates California wine, cuisine

June 19, 2014  |  News  |  ,

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June 19, 2014 12:00 am \ Staff Report

 http://syvnews.com/lifestyles/central-coast-wine-classic-celebrates-california-wine-cuisine/article_053c82da-0dd7-53d9-9ef0-1a84534fe8ff.html

 In a celebration which promises to impress and delight the most sophisticated of wine enthusiasts and “foodies,” the 29th annual Central Coast Wine Classic presents a weekend of fine wine and cuisine, July 10-12.

As the premier CentralCoast event that features local wineries and restaurants, the Classic draws crowds from across the country and around the world.

Many charities on the CentralCoast will be awarded gifts, including the Rona Barrett Foundation.

“We at the Rona Barrett Foundation are honored for being chosen the recipient of this year’s Fund-A-Need award,” said Rona Barrett, founder and CEO of the Rona Barrett Foundation. “We hope the Golden Inn & Village will be a solution to the growing crisis of how we house and care for our vulnerable seniors, and a pilot showcase for the Central Valley to be replicated elsewhere. Our pilot facility will be built in the Santa Ynez Valley and completed in 2016.”

Barrett also said the funds from the Central Coast Classic Wine Foundation will be used to establish requirements of a commercial kitchen they are calling “The Saucy & Seasoned Senior Kitchen.”

The Golden Inn & Village to be completed in 2016 will introduce an entire program of food events, lessons and the latest best foods for seniors.

“We hope to make it an interactive kitchen with well-known chefs coming by to help us,” Barrett said.

The kitchen will feed all who work for the GIV (Golden Inn & Village) as well as independent seniors and Adult Day Care attendees along with those who will live in the Assisted Living/ Memory Care facility. The Rona Barrett Foundation, a nonprofit organization, seeks to provide a solution to affordable housing and supportive services for seniors in need with the development of the Golden Inn & Village, where seniors may access a variety of care that meets their needs as they age in place. The GIV will be home to over 60 independent, orphaned and veteran seniors 62 and older. There are also 27 units of  one, two and three bedrooms for employee/ family residents. The GIV will also have a separate facility for those needing Assisted Living and Memory Care. Hospice facilities will also be available.

The deadline to buy tickets for the July 10-12 event is Sunday.

For more information and a comprehensive schedule of the weekend’s events, visit www.centralcoastwineclassic.org

 

When Harry met Max

June 19, 2014  |  News  |  ,

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http://syvnews.com/lifestyles/when-harry-met-max/article_5fcefccb-b6ad-5169-b089-37d94a53d0c4.html

 June 19, 2014 12:00 am    By Rona Barrett

 “A very interesting thing happened today,” my girlfriend told me in a conversation a few years ago.

Her son Max had come home from school excitedly and exclaimed, “Ma, I had a fun time today. We went to see the old people. I talked to an old man. He asked me all kinds of questions. Who am I? What do I want to be when I grow up? And then he told me stories about himself. He was very funny and nice!”

My friend delightedly asked him, “What was the man’s name?” Max answered, “He only had one name: Harry.” Surprised, my friend asked, “Were you talking to Rona’s dad, Harry?” Max shrugged answering, “I don’t know.”

Sure enough, when I asked my dad, “What did you do at the senior center today, Daddy?,” he enthused, “Oh, they had some kids in from the school next door, and there was a nice boy who came over to talk to me and we had a wonderful time together!”

I quizzed him, “Do you know who you were talking to? I think it was Lindy’s son, Max?” He shrugged answering, “Max, Shmax, I can’t even remember my own name.”

My dad was just being his irascible self, but I knew he was happy to have encountered someone he enjoyed being with. It didn’t matter if Max was four or eighty-four. It was fun — for both of them.

What the good folks at the adult day center were doing when my dad was there is called today, “intergenerational programming” or “intergenerational shared sites.” I love the concept of adult care programs that purposefully and meaningfully combine childcare program activities that give everyone involved the benefit of sharing their experiences, talents and skills – while having fun doing it!

Intergenerational care activities allow children and seniors the opportunity to appreciate what the other has to offer, especially when the child doesn’t have the advantage of grandparents nearby and the senior’s grandchildren live too far away to interact even occasionally.

Turns out, everything the developing young child needs with regard to their physical, social, emotional, psychological, and intellectual growth is almost exactly what aging seniors need to improve and maintain their cognitive functions: memory, focus, thought speed and clarity.

This concept actually started in 1963 as a part of the “War on Poverty.” The first program was called the “Foster Grandparent Program.” Today, the 100-member Generations United — a national membership organization of agencies that focus on improving the lives of youth and elders through intergenerational strategies, programs and public policy — has a map on their website that shows more than 1,000 such programs across the country.

I’m looking forward to the Golden Inn & Village providing these much needed programs. After all, our parents did this all the time. They didn’t have fancy names for it; they just knew how important it was to take care of each other – whether they were caring for 4-year-olds or 84-year-olds!

Until next time … keep thinking the good thoughts.

 

Rona Barrett is president and CEO of the nonprofit Rona Barrett Foundation dedicated to finding solutions with affordable housing and care services for Seniors In Need. Reach her at [email protected]

 

 

 

Rona Barrett: Let’s Resolve to Take This Job (of Caring for Beloved Elder) and Love It!

June 17, 2014  |  News  | 

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http://www.noozhawk.com/article/rona_barrett_take_this_job_caring_beloved_elder_love_it_20140617

By Rona Barrett | Published on 06.17.2014 2:36 p.m.

Here are a few tips for the 35 million Americans who care for a beloved elder.

With tongue placed firmly in cheek, repeat after me, I do hereby resolve:

To not lose my patience when I say, “Dad, we have to do something about your memory,” and he says, “I agree. Who’s Dad?”

To tolerate the heat in my beloved elder’s home even though it feels like the furnace is set at “nuclear blast.”

To remain calm when my beloved elder insists that he is still “perfectly all right to drive,” even though we are both squished into the front of a tow truck.

To not pull my hair out when my beloved elder says, “I know, I’m a martyr and I only have myself to blame.”

To not respond when my beloved elder asks, “What’s wrong with what I’m wearing?” And I’m thinking, “Your clothes are so old that if I threw them in a thrift store bin, the bin would throw them back!”

To deal with deep bouts of depression, frustration, loneliness, temporary mental breakdowns — and that’s just my own!

To avoid saying, when he asks if his new girlfriend could replace my deceased mother, “It’s alright with me — if the mortician can arrange it.”

To not complain when I promise myself to take time to work on my backhand, but instead install my tennis balls on the bottom of my beloved elder’s walker.

To not repeat that my beloved elder doesn’t need longer arms to read better — just a new eyeglass prescription.

To be patient when my detailed instruction about any “newfangled gadget” that glows, blinks, buzzes or flashes digital numbers is followed by my beloved elder saying, “OK, but I lost you after ‘This is the ‘on/off’ button … .”

To not laugh when my beloved elder tells me she’s looking for her glasses, and I say, “They’re right there on your nose,” and her reply is, “I already looked there!”

To not scream at the top of my lungs when I find myself repeating for the third time, “Dad! Why aren’t you wearing your hearing aid?” and he says, “You don’t have to yell!”

To always ask the opinion about the job I’m doing from my family experts who live 2,000 miles away — because they’ll give it to me anyway.

To not walk away when my beloved elder tells me I’ve always been her favorite of all her children, then calls me by my sibling’s name.

Now, with tongue out of cheek, repeat after me, I do hereby resolve:

To remember no one will know I need caregiver relief if I do not ask for assistance.

To not feel guilty about taking much-needed relief.

To use my relief time to recharge and alleviate my two worst enemies: fatigue and stress.

To call Senior Connection at 800.510.2020 should I need to vent with someone facing similar challenges, or seek out a support group who can empathize and share what works for them.

Until then, I resolve that we all continue to think good thoughts.

— In honor of her late father, entertainment journalist, author, senior activist and Santa Barbara County resident Rona Barrett is the driving force behind the Golden Inn & Village, the area’s first affordable senior living and care facility, scheduled to begin construction in early 2015. Contact her at [email protected]. The opinions expressed are her own.

 

Pacific Western Bank Donates to the Rona Barrett Foundation

June 6, 2014  |  News  | 

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Rona Barrett’s ‘Gray Matters’ Column Makes Its Debut on Noozhawk

May 6, 2014  |  News  | 

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http://www.noozhawk.com/article/rona_barretts_gray_matters_column_makes_its_debut_on_noozhawk_20140506

SOURCE: KELLY KAPAUN FOR RONA BARRETT

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Rona Barrett

Santa BarbaraCounty resident Rona Barrett will share her poignant, funny and useful insights, as only she can, with Noozhawk readers. Her “Gray Matters” column addresses topics related to seniors.

“Seniors are the fastest-growing demographic in our country, yet they, and all of us frankly, are really unprepared for what lies ahead as we live longer and not necessarily better,” Barrett said. “We all have to wake up to the realities of aging in terms of health care, affordable housing, levels of care, resources, care giving, finances, elder abuse and how seniors can stay active, healthy and happy. My column will address all of these issues and more.

“I’m thrilled to be a part of Noozhawk, which has really become an important ‘go-to’ news source in our area,” she added. “It’s apropos for ‘Gray Matters’ to appear on Noozhawk as news had adapted to a quickly changing world — just as I hope to ensure the same thing happens for our nation’s seniors.”

Hollywood’s Variety Magazinecalls Barrett “the lady who turned entertainment coverage into Big Biz.” Barrett is a pioneering entertainment reporter, commentator and producer with a career spanning more than 30 years. Now as a nonprofit pioneer, she is the founder and CEO of theRona Barrett Foundation — the catalyst behind Santa Ynez Valley’s first affordable senior housing — The Golden Inn & Village.

Since 2000, in honor of her father, Barrett has used her entrepreneurial acumen to address a challenge close to her heart and an issue that affects us all: providing affordable and dignified housing and care for America’ fastest-growing population.

“Gray Matters” columns can be found twice monthly on Noozhawk, starting Tuesday.

The nonprofit Rona Barrett Foundation seeks to provide a solution to affordable housing and supportive services for seniors in need with the development of The Golden Inn & Village, where seniors may access a variety of care that meets their needs as they age in place.

Click here for more information about the Rona Barrett Foundation.

— Kelly Kapaun of SurfMedia Communications represents Rona Barrett.